Food & Beverage Perspectives
eggs_diabetes

Protein-Rich Breakfast Prevents Body Fat Gain

Yes indeed, protein is the new black. From snack bars and sports-nutrition drinks to cereal and everything in between, protein is the it ingredient. And rightfully so. A recent study published in Obesity examined whether the eating a normal-protein (NP)  breakfast versus a high-protein (HP) breakfast improved appetite control, food intake and body composition in “breakfast-skipping" young people with overweight/obesity

Yes indeed, protein is the new black. From snack bars and sports-nutrition drinks to cereal and everything in between, protein is the it ingredient. And rightfully so. A recent study published in Obesity examined whether the eating a normal-protein (NP)  breakfast versus a high-protein (HP) breakfast improved appetite control, food intake and body composition in “breakfast-skipping" young people with overweight/obesity (2015;23(9):1761-64).

Fifty-seven adolescents completed a 12-week randomized controlled trial in which the adolescents consumed either a 1,464 kJ NP breakfast (13 g of protein) or a HP breakfast (35 g of protein) or continued to skip breakfast (CON). Pre- and post-study appetite, food intake, body weight and body composition were assessed.

Time-by-group interactions were detected for body fat mass, daily intake and perceived hunger. Specifically, HP prevented fat mass gains over the 12 weeks, whereas NP did not. HP led to reductions in daily intake versus CON, whereas NP did not. Lastly, only the HP group experienced reductions in daily hunger versus CON; however, when directly comparing the HP versus NP groups, no differences were detected in any outcomes.

The daily addition of a high-protein breakfast improved indices of weight management as illustrated by the prevention of body fat gain, voluntary reductions in daily intake and reductions in daily hunger in breakfast-skipping adolescents with overweight/obesity.

And there you have it.

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