Consumers demand almost as much from the packages that hold their foods and supplements as they do from the products themselves.

Sandy Almendarez, VP of Content

March 1, 2019

2 Min Read
Packaging takeaways.jpg

Consumers demand almost as much from the packages that hold their foods and supplements as they do from the products themselves. Packages must clearly communicate product attributes, must not harm the environment and must stand out among the sea of competitors on store shelves or in online searches.

Sustainable packaging can sway a consumer toward a product, or put them off, which has encouraged brands to use innovative packaging that uses less material and/or uses material that can be recycled or is made from recycled components. One such innovation in this area is packaging that can be composted in backyard gardens. However, “clean packaging” doesn’t have a universal definition, so brands must listen to their consumers and respond to their demands.

Brands must use these sustainable packages, but not at the expense of the safety or the quality of the products. Air-tight and micro-perforated packaging can separate contaminants from products, and thus maintain contaminate-free and unoxidized products. Packages should also be free of chemicals that could leak into the foods, causing spoiling or unpleasant olfactory effects. Product transport also needs to be considered as many shipping routes require goods to be stored in heat or cold for several weeks.

A sustainable, safe package won’t do consumers good if they aren’t attracted to the messages or design, so marketers must also use this real estate to best position their products. Along with product attributes, brand story and legal requirements, brands can highlight the packaging components to help build trust and transparency with customers. Millennials especially want a social media-ready aesthetic, so beauty and an “unboxing” appeal will bring more consumer interest.

Product claims cannot expand beyond the bounds of what is legal. Supplement and food packages cannot make disease claims, and health claims require FDA approval. Structure/function claims don’t require government pre-approval, but brands must notify FDA 30 days after marketing the dietary supplement with the claim.

Legally, packages must also include a supplement facts panel or a nutrition facts panel (for foods) that lists the names and quantities of ingredients, and new fiber and sugar labeling requirements are set to take effect in 2020. Slack fill laws are another consideration because packages must truthfully represent the amount of goods in the container and not make products seem bigger—or more plentiful—than they are.

While packaging is not the main feature of a product on the market, it cannot be an afterthought given consumer demands and legal requirements.

For more, download the Navigating the Food and Beverage Co-Packing Landscape digital magazine.

About the Author(s)

Sandy Almendarez

VP of Content, Informa

Summary

• Well-known subject matter expert within the health & nutrition industry with more than 15 years’ experience reporting on natural products.

• She cares a lot about how healthy products are made, where their ingredients are sourced and how they affect human health.

• She knows that it’s the people behind the businesses — their motivations, feelings and emotions — drive industry growth, so that’s where she looks for content opportunities.

Sandy Almendarez is VP of Content for SupplySide and an award-winning journalist. She oversees the editorial and content marketing teams for the B2B media brands Natural Products Insider and Food and Beverage Insider, the education programming for the health and nutrition trade shows SupplySide East and SupplySide West, and community engagement across the SupplySide portfolio. She is a seasoned content strategist with a passion for health, good nutrition, sustainability and inclusion. With over 15 years of experience in the health and nutrition industry, Sandy brings a wealth of knowledge to her role as a content-focused business leader. With specialization in topics ranging from product development to content engagement, creative marketing and c-suite decision making, her work is known for its engaging style and its relevance for business leaders in the health and nutrition industry.

In her free time, Sandy loves running, drinking hot tea and watching her two kids grow up. She brews her own “Sandbucha” homemade kombucha; she’s happy to share if you’re ever in Phoenix!

Awards:

Speaker credentials

Resides in

  • Phoenix, AZ

Education

  • Arizona State University

Contact:

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