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DDS-1 Strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus Demonstrates Symptomatic Relief for Lactose Intolerance

Nutrition Journal has published the results of a new probiotic human clinical trial in which Nebraska Cultures, Inc. commissioned a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial on the effects of DDS-1 strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus on lactose intolerance.

September 14, 2016

1 Min Read
DDS-1 Strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus Demonstrates Symptomatic Relief for Lactose Intolerance

News Release

Nutrition Journal has published the results of a new probiotic human clinical trial in which Nebraska Cultures, Inc. commissioned a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial on the effects of DDS-1 strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus on lactose intolerance. Preclinical studies have found that Lactobacillus acidophilus supplementation may assist in breaking down lactose; however, no human clinical trials exist evaluating its efficacy in alleviating symptoms related to lactose intolerance. The full study is open access and available on the journal’s website, and may be accessed here: http://tinyurl.com/jqnumjw.

The trial found that the DDS-1 strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus, manufactured by Nebraska Cultures, demonstrated statistically significant reduction in abdominal symptom scores at week 4 for diarrhea, cramping, vomiting and overall symptoms. No adverse events were reported. The longitudinal comparison between the DDS-1 group and the placebo group was conducted with a 6–h Lactose Challenge.

“This clinical research demonstrates that supplementation with the DDS-1 strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus, produced by Nebraska Cultures, is an important part of restoring balance and alleviating symptoms for lactose sensitive people," said Michael Shahani, chief operations officer for the company. “People have used this strain for decades to promote overall healthy digestion and this additional evidence is another good reason to formulate probiotic products with it."

For more information, visit nebraskacultures.com.

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