Healthy INSIDER Podcast 1: FDA Recommends Against Using 'Non GMO' Labeling

In November 2015, FDA issued final guidance on voluntarily labeling for foods derive from genetically engineered (GE) plants. Interestingly, the agency encouraged industry to avoid statements such as “GMO free," “GE free" and “non-GMO," which are widely used on product packaging.

In November 2015, FDA issued final guidance on voluntarily labeling for foods derive from genetically engineered (GE) plants. Interestingly, the agency encouraged industry to avoid statements such as “GMO free," “GE free" and “non-GMO," which are widely used on product packaging.

Instead, FDA offered appropriate examples including, “Not bioengineered," “Not genetically engineered" and “We do not use ingredients that were produced using modern biotechnology." Other examples include “Not genetically modified through the use of modern biotechnology," “This oil is made from soybeans that were not genetically engineered," and “Our corn growers do not plant bioengineered seeds."

FDA does not require labels on foods derived from GE plants. Regulators can only do so under federal law if a “material difference" exists between the GE product and its traditional counterpart, the agency said. While FDA guidance doesn’t carry the force of law, it provides direction food marketers.

In this episode, Sandy Almendarez, editor in chief, INSIDER, and Heather Granato, vice president of content, Global Health and Nutrition Network, Informa Exhibitions, discuss:

  • The popularity of products labeled ‘non GMO.’
  • Legislation around the world regarding labeling of GMO products.
  • FDA’s take on the safety of products made with GMOs.

 

Links and Resources:

 

Got feedback? Email Sandy Almendarez at [email protected] or Heather Granato at [email protected], or tweet to @NatProdINSIDER using the hashtag #INSIDERPodcast.

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