Food & Beverage Perspectives
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Millennial Moms Seek Convenient, Nutritious Food Choices

According to a Pew Research Center population report released by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2016, Millennials have surpassed Baby Boomers as the nation’s largest living generation, now numbering 75.4 million in the United States, compared to 74.9 million Baby Boomers. Millennials are diverse, they wield immense spending power, and they’re said to widely differ compared to preceding generations across a number of attitudes, beliefs and behaviors. This combination of factors makes Millennials, well, influential. And for marketers and manufacturers, that makes this demographic group a worthy target.

According to a Pew Research Center population report released by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2016, Millennials have surpassed Baby Boomers as the nation’s largest living generation, now numbering 75.4 million in the United States, compared to 74.9 million Baby Boomers. Millennials are diverse, they wield immense spending power, and they’re said to widely differ compared to preceding generations across a number of attitudes, beliefs and behaviors. This combination of factors makes Millennials, well, influential. And for marketers and manufacturers, that makes this demographic group a worthy target.

Millennial moms are a huge segment of the population, and they have the buying power to affect food companies’ flavor strategies, applications and packaging, according to a new trend report from FONA International. With so many working mothers in the pool of Millennial moms, considerations should include on-the-go nutrition and a way to appeal to their personal branding—give them something to blog about. Indulgence often comes when kids are in the equation but common-sense serving sizes make Millennial moms more likely to pick up that less healthy option.

According to NDP, 67 percent of younger moms shop at places considered more convenient to their needs. Though online shopping plays a much heavier role with Millennials, so do well-organized, big-box retailers that offer a wide variety of items. With such a large number of Millennial moms working, this preference for big-box retailers can be attributed, at least in part, to the time it takes to shop one location over several. The more organized the retailer, the better, as moms’ preferences are for stores where their needs can be quickly found and purchased.

Among these needs is an emphasis on healthier food options for the family. More than previous generations, Millennials tend to purchase greater volumes of organic and locally sourced foods; however, many of these healthier food choices, such as fruits and vegetables, can take a considerable amount of time to clean, cut, and prepare. Time is always a key factor in the busy lives of younger moms.  As reported by the PBH Foundation, 60 percent of moms spend 30 minutes or less preparing a meal. Of that 60 percent, many spend only 10 minutes preparing a meal. There is a definite need for healthier food choices that circumvent demanding meal-prep time, whether that means vegetables coming pre-cut or healthy meals that are already partially prepared. So long as it is quick, healthy, and flavorful, younger moms are less picky as to what form the conveniently prepared food arrives in.

Food companies that focus on these two factors, convenience and health, have found considerable opportunity with Millennial moms. As seen in the snacking industry, oats and vegetable snacks are on the rise as a conscious alternative for families on the go.

Beyond food, nutrition and convenience, identity and ethos are also important for Millennial moms. With better access to information than in previous generations, younger moms aren’t just purchasing what’s most affordable, they want to be able to make a well-researched, smart and conscious decision.

Take a look at three key factors—according to the U.S. Census Bureau, almost 84 percent of all U.S. households have some form of computer; Millennial moms, more than any other generation of moms, are 78 percent more likely to consider social media important for showing support of their favorite brands; and younger moms are also 71 percent more likely to have blogged about their purchasing experiences and 28 percent more likely to have rated or reviewed products and services on social media.

This means Millennial moms aren’t just seeking out and buying certain products, they’re engaging their family and friends about the identity behind these products, too. They want to share their experiences and feel good about the choices they make. Health is important, but so is community and a sense of smart, independent decision making. And if a product also can promote a positive impact or worldly cause? Even better, as it makes Millennials more than eager to share their familiarity and fondness for products that enhance their identities.

To learn more about the power of the Millennial, check out Healthy INSIDER Podcast 24: Why Your Business Needs a Millennial Strategy to hear Rachel Adams, managing editor, and Jeff Hilton, partner and co-founder of BrandHive, discuss who Millennials are, and what makes them impactful compared to previous generations; the roles of transparency, authenticity, relatability and science in reaching Millennial consumers; and the necessity of actively and strategically marketing to Millennials.

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