Umami Taste Receptors Found

July 9, 2009

1 Min Read
Umami Taste Receptors Found

PHILADELPHIAUsing a combination of sensory, genetic, and in vitro approaches, researchers from the Monell Center confirm that the T1R1-T1R3 taste receptor plays a role in human umami (amino acid) taste. They also said variations in the genes that code for this receptor correspond to individual variation in sensitivity to and perceived intensity of umami taste.

These findings bolster our understanding of human taste variation and individual differences in tastes for essential nutrients, says senior author Paul A.S. Breslin PhD, a sensory geneticist at Monell.

Umami is the taste quality associated with several amino acids, especially the amino acid L-glutamate. High levels of glutamate are present in many protein-rich foods, including meats and cheeses, in vegetables such as mushrooms, peas, and tomatoes, and in human breast milk.

 

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