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Video: RDs Praise Industry's Attempt to Reduce Protein Spiking

<p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt;">Common tests used to determine protein quality can be fooled by interior product, according to Dave Ellis, R.D., former president of the <a href="http://www.sportsrd.org/" target="_blank">Collegiate and Professionals Sports Dietitians Association</a> (CPSDA), who gave a presentation at the CPSDA annual conference in May. However, Ellis said he was happy supplement trade organizations, such as the <a href="http://www.crnusa.org/" target="_blank">Council for Responsible Nutrition</a> (CRN), are setting new standards among members to reduce the risk of mislabeled protein products.</p>

Common tests used to determine protein quality can be fooled by interior product, according to Dave Ellis, R.D., former president of the Collegiate and Professionals Sports Dietitians Association (CPSDA), who gave a presentation at the CPSDA annual conference in May. However, Ellis said he was happy supplement trade organizations, such as the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), are setting new standards among members to reduce the risk of mislabeled protein products.

In this exclusive INSIDER interview, Ellis also discusses organized crime’s involvement in supplement adulteration and what dietitians looks for in sports supplements.

Get an overview of the conference in the blog post, “The End of ‘Proprietary Blends’ and other Supplement Issues for Sports Dietitians” from INSIDER’s editor in chief.

For more information on protein, check out:

Check out the other video interview from this conference:

Meth Analogues a New Trend in Supplement Adulteration

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