Video: Meth Analogues a New Trend in Supplement Adulteration

<p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt;">NSF International&rsquo;s general manager, Lisa Thomas said NSF is finding methamphetamine analogues in illegal products that label themselves as dietary supplements.</p>

NSF International’s general manager, Lisa Thomas said NSF is finding methamphetamine analogues in illegal products that label themselves as dietary supplements. Thomas, general manager of NSF International’s dietary supplement programs, noted this alarming trend at the annual conference of the Collegiate and Professionals Sports Dietitians Association (CPSDA) in May. She said these products often claim the ingredient is sourced from botanicals.

In particular, Thomas mentioned the adulterant N,alpha-diethylphenylethylamine (N,a-DEPEA), which NSF reported in an article published in Drug Testing and Analysis. The substance was found in a product called Craze (marketed by Driven Sports Inc.), which also spurred a warning from FDA.

Hear Thomas discuss this adulteration trend along with protein spiking, NSF’s certification for Sport program and why certain ingredients, such as yerba mate and maca, aren’t allowed in NSF’s sports certification program.

 Get an overview of the conference in a blog post, “The End of ‘Proprietary Blends’ and other Supplement Issues for Sports Dietitians” from INSIDER’s editor in chief.

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