Brassica Expands License Agreement With Johns Hopkins

Brassica Protection Products LLC expanded its exclusive license agreement with Johns Hopkins University, which gives consumers worldwide access to the company’s SGS branded products.

BALTIMORE—Brassica Protection Products LLC expanded its exclusive license agreement with Johns Hopkins University, which gives consumers worldwide access to the company’s SGS branded products.

Brassica is licensing the intellectual property surrounding the extraction technology for the class of phytonutrients glucosinolates (e.g. glucoraphanin) and isothiocyanates (e.g. sulforaphane) from most cruciferous seeds and sprouts, particularly broccoli. Additionally, the intellectual property covers a variety of uses for specific health benefits related to these phytonutrients, such as antioxidant activity and protection against oxidative stress.

Brassica Protection Products produces the SGS branded source of glucoraphanin, which can be found in a variety of nutritional supplements and Brassica Tea.

Glucoraphanin is the important phytonutrient in broccoli that provides a significant number of health benefits related to the up-regulation of phase 2 detoxification enzymes. When consumed, glucoraphanin is converted to a potent antioxidant and cellular protector called sulforaphane. Sulforaphane is produced in the body when the enzyme myrosinase, also present in broccoli, interacts with glucoraphanin upon damage (such as chewing) to the plant. Broccoli seeds and young sprouts contain 20 to 50 times more glucoraphanin than adult broccoli. If glucoraphanin is consumed without myrosinase – as in a supplement form – the body’s natural microflora will convert the glucoraphanin to sulforaphane.

SGS glucoraphanin is made from seeds grown in the United States. The glucoraphanin is extracted from seeds using a proprietary water extraction method. SGS glucoraphanin is self-affirmed generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and is both kosher and halal.

Previous research shows broccoli appears to support antioxidant defenses in the eye to fight the development of cataracts.

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