Video: Holes in Supply Chain Could Lead to Food Fraud

<p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt;">A loose supply chain management makes a supplement or food company an easier target for food fraud, according to Doug Moyer, researcher and professor at Michigan State University&rsquo;s <a href="http://foodfraud.msu.edu/" target="_blank">Food Fraud Initiative</a>, who spoke at the <a href="http://www.sportsrd.org/" target="_blank">Collegiate and Professionals Sports Dietitians Association</a> (CPSDA) annual conference in May.</p>

A loose supply chain management makes a supplement or food company an easier target for food fraud, according to Doug Moyer, researcher and professor at Michigan State University’s Food Fraud Initiative, who spoke at the Collegiate and Professionals Sports Dietitians Association (CPSDA) annual conference in May.

Food fraud goes beyond adulteration to include counterfeiting, theft and tampering; and a company could be held responsible if its products are subject to fraud. That is why the supply chain from raw materials to manufacturing and packaging needs to be tightly controlled, according to Moyer.

Watch the INSIDER exclusive interview with Moyer to learn more about what companies can do to prevent food fraud.

Get an overview of the conference in the blog post, “The End of ‘Proprietary Blends’ and other Supplement Issues for Sports Dietitians” from INSIDER’s editor in chief.

Check out other video interviews from this conference:

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