IOM Discusses Safety of Caffeine at FDA's Request

<p>The Institute of Medicine (IOM) held a public workshop on caffeine in food and dietary supplements in August 2013, at the request of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), prompted by concern over the safety of caffeine. IOM published today the results of the workshop in a 150-page summary.</p>

WASHINGTONThe Institute of Medicine (IOM) held a public workshop on caffeine in food and dietary supplements in August 2013, at the request of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), prompted by concern over the safety of caffeine. IOM published today the results of the workshop in a 150-page summary.

"In the last ten years, the marketplace has seen an influx of caffeinated energy drinks and a wide range of foods with added caffeine," FDA said in a statement. "It is apparent that caffeine is now appearing in a range of new foods and beverages."

In particular, FDA is concerned about the availability of caffeine and products containing caffeine to children and adolescents, and whether caffeine poses a greater health risk to those populations. "We are especially concerned with products that may be attractive and readily available to children and adolescents, without careful consideration of their cumulative impact," FDA said.

In the summary, IOM did not make any recommendations on caffeine consumption, nor did it state a position on the matter. Instead, the workshop discussed the safety of caffeine in food and dietary supplementsincluding tea, coffee, carbonated soft drinks, and other productsand worked to identify potential gaps.

In addition, the workshop explored safe caffeine exposure levels and populations that may be at risk from caffeine exposure. Caffeine's effects on cardiovascular disease and on the central nervous system and behavior were also discussed, along with caffeine's interactions with other ingredients in foods and beverages.

Caffeine has been generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by FDA in cola-type beverages since the 1950s. Since, FDA has removed alcoholic beverages containing caffeine from the market, due to associated risky behaviors. FDA has not further regulated the use of caffeine.

During the workshop, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said, "The meetings allow us to take a close and thorough look at what is happening in the marketplace, how industry is proceeding with so-called innovation, what the science reveals about this area, and what actions, if any, might be necessary."

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish