Deerland Enzymes Obtains Natural Product Number

Deerland Enzymes received a Natural Product Number (NPN) for the enzyme ProHydrolase, allowing the company to sell its product throughout Canada.

KENNESAW, Ga.—Deerland Enzymes received a Natural Product Number (NPN) for the enzyme ProHydrolase, allowing the company to sell its product throughout Canada.

The new product license for ProHydrolase was issued by the Natural Health Products Directorate of Health Canada. ProHydrolase is a proprietary enzyme blend that maximizes protein digestion to aid in muscle recovery and muscle building. Its effectiveness is supported by two human clinical trials that demonstrate its ability to increase amino acid levels in the blood, supporting muscle recovery, as well as decrease C-reactive protein levels, which is an indicator of inflammation in the body.

Amino acids in the blood are shown to increase by 20 percent with the consumption of a whey protein supplement accompanied by ProHydrolase, compared to the consumption of whey alone. ProHydrolase is also effective at digesting other proteins such as casein, soy, egg, pea and hemp.

All natural health products (NHPs) sold in Canada are subject to the Natural Health Products Regulations, which came into effect on January 1, 2004. These regulations state all NHPs must have a product license before they can be sold in Canada.

“We appreciate the rigor of the process for product approval in Canada, and we’re pleased that ProHydrolase has met the justifiably stringent standards that are in place for all natural health products," said Scott Ravech, CEO of Deerland Enzymes. “Based on the success of ProHydrolase in the United States, we are excited to be able to offer this best-in-class protein hydrolysis product to Canadian consumers, and we expect to see a significant growth in demand."

Deerland Enzymes partnered with leading distributor Chemroy Canada to market ProHydrolase in Canada.

In 2013, Deerland Enzymes also released a new blend made of lactose and protease to help break down the lactose associated with intolerances.

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