Coffee, Energy Drink Use Increase in Children

Almost 73% of children consume caffeine on a given day, according a recent study published in Pediatrics.

WASHINGTONAlmost 73% of children consume caffeine on a given day, according a recent study published in Pediatrics.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assessed trends and demographic differences in mean caffeine intake among children and adolescents due to the increasing energy drink sales. Using the 24-hour recall, researchers analyzed 22,000 U.S. children and adolescents between 2 and 22 years of age from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey,  taking into account soda, energy drinks, coffee and tea.

From 1999 to 2010, there were no significant trends in mean caffeine intake overall; however, caffeine intake decreased among 2- to 11-year-olds and Mexican-American children. Soda accounted for the majority of caffeine intake, but this contribution declined from 62% to 38%. Coffee accounted for 10% of caffeine intake in 1999 to 2000 but increased to nearly 24% of intake in 2009 to 2010. Energy drinks did not exist in 1999 to 2000 but increased to nearly 6% of caffeine intake in 2009 to 2010.

The beverage industry is growing in caffeine-laden energy drink. Caffeine consumption has been shown to delay brain development in children and young adults. Recently, FDA has shown concern about the availability of caffeine and caffeinated products available to children and adolescents.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish