Cargill Expands Specialty Cocoa Liquor Capabilities

<p>Cargill Cocoa &amp; Chocolate is investing &#8364;10 million to expand its specialty cocoa liquors capabilities in its plants in France and Germany in order to meet growing customer demand for premium and organic chocolate products.</p>

AMSTERDAM—Cargill Cocoa & Chocolate is investing €10 million to expand its specialty cocoa liquors capabilities in its plants in France and Germany in order to meet growing customer demand for premium and organic chocolate products.

The investment in Rouen, France, will focus on enhancing and expanding the Fine Flavor range of cocoa liquors. A production line has been dedicated to the manufacturing of small-batch specialty liquors with subtle signature tastes. The beans used for the liquors are from specific origin countries with distinctive characteristics, such as Venezuelan beans, of a mild and creamy taste, or those from Ecuador, with a flowery aroma. The dedicated Fine Flavor range production line preserves the flavors specific to each origin country and guarantees the purity of certified-organic products.

The plant in Berlin also plays an important role in the production of specialty liquors for the chocolate market and the investment significantly increases its capacity in response to additional demand for quality liquor.

In December 2013, Cargill Cocoa & Chocolate broke ground on a $48 million project to double the capacity of its Belgian chocolate production facility in Mouscron over the next two years. The additional capacity will meet growing demand for chocolate in confectionary, bakery, dairy and artisanal applications from European customers. The investment will increase capacity of both liquid dark or milk chocolate and solid chocolate drops and chunks. The new facility, slated to be operational in summer 2014, will source raw materials like cocoa butter from Cargill’s integrated cocoa processing plants in The Netherlands and France.

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