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AOAC, Fruit dOr & Others Achieve Developments to Drive Industry Forward

AOAC International, Fruit d’Or, Q’SAI Co. Ltd. and others have recently announced major industry developments, some of which include new standard method performance requirements (SMPRs), research underlying the need for a cranberry adulterants program, and various changes to further develop and expand businesses in the industry.

AOAC International, Fruit d’Or, Q’SAI Co. Ltd. and others have recently announced major industry developments, some of which include new standard method performance requirements (SMPRs), research underlying the need for a cranberry adulterants program, and various changes to further mature and expand businesses in the industry.

A new dietary supplement initiative by AOAC International is working to develop voluntary consensus standards—focused on anthocyanins, chondroitin and PDE5 inhibitors—under contract with the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS). The AOAC standard method performance requirements (SMPRs) provide the technical specifications and other precise criteria for each ingredient’s method performance requirements. Current work also focuses on ashwagandha, cinnamon, folin C, kratom and other ingredients chosen as priority dietary supplements based on industry feedback. As part of the AOAC Mid-Year Meeting scheduled for March 16 to 20, in Gaithersburg, Maryland, working groups are also expected to begin standards development activities for three new ingredients identified as priority: vitamin D, tea and aloe.

Fruit d'Or also recently announced its full support of the research of Christian Krueger, a leader in cranberry research credited with conducting groundbreaking cranberry phytochemistry studies, and who also developed chemistry instrumentation and other analytical tools capable of creating ingredient “fingerprints," beginning with cranberry polyphenols. Krueger's latest treatise, "Three Pillars Needed to Strengthen the Cranberry Industry" (February 2015), details why the principles and practices of authenticity, standardization and efficacy are inseparable, and why all three must exist wholly to ensure that final cranberry products deliver absolute viability as claimed on the label to the consumer. Fruit d'Or offers multiple videos featuring Krueger, which can be accessed via its YouTube channel. Mark Blumenthal, founder and executive director of the American Botanical Council, agrees with Krueger’s stance and said a need exists for new analytical tools and reference standards to prevent cranberry adulterations and strengthen the cranberry industry. Organizations such as ABC are meeting to work with industry stakeholders to establish a cranberry adulterations program.

Another business development comes from Carotech, which officially changed its business name and commenced operations as ExcelVite Inc. ExcelVite has optimized and consolidated its business model to ensure continuous growth and uninterrupted supply of its products to its customers. These products include EVNol™ (formerly Tocomin®) and EVNol SupraBio™ (formerly Tocomin SupraBio®), as well as EVTene™ (formerly Caromin®) and EVRol™ (formerly Stelessterol™).

Celebrating 50 years serving healthy lifestyles of the Japanese, Q’SAI Co. Ltd. formed Q’SAI USA Inc., a new United States wholly-owned subsidiary that will soon introduce American versions of health products that have become staples in Japan. Q’SAI USA will bring U.S. consumers scientifically-proven nutritional ingredients, beginning with a 100-percent USDA certified organic kale in ultra-fine powder, featuring a patented production process (Japan Patent No. 5214089). This product, named fujiKale, was released in January 2015.

And finally, exciting news also came from the R&D company Tetrahedron, who announced that an independent panel of scientific experts confirmed the GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status of its L-ergothioneine under the brand name ERGONEINETM. The ingredient, which helps create balance in a diet potentially lacking in L-ergothioneine, is now available for incorporation into nutritional products. L-ergothioneine is a unique naturally occurring nutrient produced in nature only by microorganisms and fungi; mushrooms, black and red beans, oat bran, garlic and some meat products (liver and kidney) are the main dietary sources of L-ergothioneine.

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