AHPA Publishes Recommendations for Regulators on Cannabis

The recommendations, issued by AHPA’s Cannabis Committee, have been considered by several states in their development of state medical marijuana program regulations, the association said.

WASHINGTON—The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) has published recommendations for regulators that are overseeing products derived from cannabis that are being legally marketed.

The recommendations, issued by AHPA’s Cannabis Committee, have been considered by several states in their development of state medical marijuana program regulations, including Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada and Oregon, the association said.

Thirty five states have laws specific to medical marijuana or cannabidiol (CBD), a marijuana derivative, according to NORML, a Washington, D.C.-based organization that is working to legalize marijuana by adults. Colorado and Washington also have legalized marijuana for recreational use. No legitimate use for marijuana is recognized under federal law, and it remains illegal under the Controlled Substances Act.

AHPA developed the cannabis recommendations to address cultivation and processing operations, manufacturing and related operations, laboratory operations and dispensing operations.

"AHPA encourages regulatory authorities in states and local municipalities where use of cannabis is allowed under local law to adopt these recommendations in order to promote the responsible commerce of this important botanical," said AHPA cannabis committee chair Tim Smale, founder and executive director of the nonprofit Remedy Compassion Center in Maine, in a statement. "These best practice recommendations provide a framework for the oversight of cannabis production and distribution practices from seed to consumption."

To learn about initial demand for recreational marijuana in Colorado after it was legalized, check out this video from Natural Products INSIDER.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish