Deerland Enzymes Releases Research on Anti-Microbials

<p>A new research study conducted by Deerland Enzymes explains the effect of specific compounds on the colonic bacteria that are present in small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBOS).</p>

KENNESAW, Ga.—A new research study conducted by Deerland Enzymes explains the effect of specific compounds on the colonic bacteria that are present in small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBOS). (Natural Medicine Journal. 2014 Oct; 6(10))

The study’s authors include Deerland Enzymes’ vice president of technology, John Deaton, Ph.D., along with Theodore Hersh, MD, chief science officer of the alliance with healthcare technology company Thione International, and other members of the Deerland Enzymes research and development team. Researchers focused on enzymes and other anti-microbial ingredients, such as chelators, peptides and essential oils.

“Our aim was to determine the optimal combination of specific enzymes and antimicrobial ingredients in the reduction and suppression of the growth of various SIBOS-causing bacteria," Deaton said. 

SIBOS is a common problem for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, according to the study authors, and it results from opportunistic pathogenic bacteria colonizing in the small intestine (where digestion and absorption primarily occur). In addition, SIBOS can cause malnutrition, diarrhea and bloating, and these symptoms are usually the worst right after a meal.

The objective of Deerland Enzyme’s trial was to determine if a combination of naturally occurring antimicrobials could allow reduction and suppression of the invading microorganisms under physiological conditions, so when a patient consumes the combination before eating, the nutrients would be broken down and used by the body. Then, the body would have time to heal and the probiotics would establish control over the pathogenic bacteria. 

The article in its entirety can be found in the October 2014 issue of Natural Medicine Journal.  

 In August, Deerland Enzymes added glass-bottling services to its enzyme-based supplement manufacturing capabilities.

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