energy

Attacks on Energy Drinks

<p>The furor over energy drinks hasn&#8217;t died down since a number of deaths potentially tied to the products have come to light.</p>

In spite of their rocketing sales, energy drinks have come under attack in recent years by authorities, politicians and consumer advocacy groups.

Red Bull, 5-Hour Energy and Monster have been unable to escape the heat. The hullabaloo started in 2012 when the New York Times broke the story that five deaths were linked to Monster energy drinks. Since the article was published, dozens of other fatalities tied to energy drinks have come to light, and critics have questioned the efficacy and safety of the products.

The increased scrutiny may have triggered government investigations at the local, state and federal levels. Several high-profile lawsuits contend teenagers and other consumers died after they consumed the caffeine-laden beverages and shots. Local and state authorities have accused energy drink marketers of deceptive advertising. At least three Democrats in the U.S. Senate have weighed in, raising a number of issues including concerns that energy drinks may be unsafe for children and adolescents.

As competition intensifies in the energy drink market, companies may increasingly rely on their advertising and marketing to distinguish their products. State and federal regulators are going to continue to keep a close watch. That poses a challenge for marketers. Monster, 5-Hour Energy and others must balance the need to dynamically promote their energy products while keeping their advertising practices within the confines of FTC regulations and state laws.

To learn more about recent litigations revolving around the energy drink market, read the full article, “Energy Drink Market Remains Under Siege," in the Energy Drink Digital Issue.

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