FDA: Dietary Supplements Cant Treat Concussions

In a consumer update, the agency said some companies have exploited growing concern over concussions by selling products that claim to prevent, treat or cure the brain injuries.

WASHINGTON—As another school year gets underway, and kids gear up for football season and other contact sports, FDA is warning consumers that dietary supplements cannot treat concussions or other traumatic brain injuries.

In a consumer update, the agency said some companies have exploited growing concern over concussions by selling products that claim to prevent, treat or cure the brain injuries. FDA has issued warning letters to some companies in 2012 and 2013 for making claims that their supplements can treat injuries to the brain.

“There is simply no scientific evidence to support the use of any dietary supplement for the prevention of concussions or the reduction of post-concussion symptoms that would allow athletes to return to play sooner," said Charlotte Christin, acting director of FDA’s Division of Dietary Supplement Programs, in the consumer update.

FDA cited “one common but misleading claim" that “a particular dietary supplement promotes faster healing" after a person suffers a brain injury.

"We're very concerned that false assurances of faster recovery will convince athletes of all ages, coaches and even parents that someone suffering from a concussion is ready to resume activities before they are really ready," said Gary Coody, FDA's National Health Fraud Coordinator, in the consumer update. "Also, watch for claims that these products can prevent or lessen the severity of concussions or TBIs."

TAGS: Regulatory
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