choline

The Choline Need

Research has shown choline’s benefits to liver health, prenatal development, heart health, cognition and sports nutrition. Supplement brands can educate consumers and deliver products that make it easy to get more choline in their diets.

Choline is a vitamin-like nutrient essential for helping the body maintain optimum health and carry out several critical functions. And yet, plenty of people have never heard of it. Researchers have only recently begun to study the important role that choline plays in the body, particularly for pregnant women, overweight or obese adults, older adults and athletes. They’re also finding out that most Americans aren’t getting enough choline from their diets. And today, leading government agencies are paying attention.

In fact, choline is the most recent nutrient to receive a reference daily intake (RDI) from FDA.

Choline is, in short, a powerhouse nutrient. But there’s just one problem: The body can only synthesize small amounts of choline. The rest needs to come from food or supplements, and choline’s limited food sources aren’t particularly popular. Add it all up, and it’s easy to see why many consumers are falling short, and how supplements may be best suited to fill the nutritional gap.                

Choline works in the body through four main functions:

•             It helps transport and metabolize fat and cholesterol in the liver.

•             It’s a structural component of cell membranes.

•             It helps maintain normal levels of homocysteine in the blood.

•             It’s involved in the production of neurotransmitters.

Get a closer look at just how this mineral works to promote optimum health, the consumers who need it most, and how supplements can play a valuable role in helping them get adequate amounts it in INSIDER’s Choline Digital Magazine.

A former food editor, Marygrace Taylor is an award-winning health and nutrition writer specializing in natural living. She writes for consumer and trade publications including Prevention, FITNESS and Food Service Director, and is the co-author of the cookbook Allergy-Friendly Food for Families. Visit her at marygracetaylor.com.

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