ginger

Survey shows consumers reach for ginger for nausea

Increased concern over digestive health is driving growth in this category as consumers continue to invest in various remedies to support digestive health and, ultimately, their well-being.

The digestive health category is one of the fastest-growing in the health and wellness market. Despite its popularity, however, the prevalence of digestive issues continues to skyrocket among consumers as they scurry in search of solutions. In fact, more than 28 million people visit the doctor for digestive issues each year and 8 million end up in the emergency room with digestive complaints, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Digestive health is the fastest-growing category in the nutritional supplement market, doubling its share during the last decade. However, it is largely dominated by probiotics, with a smaller share made up by enzymes. While relatively small at US$2.6 billion, there’s significant room for growth as consumers look for something other than probiotics and enzymes to satisfy their digestive health needs.

Recent consumer research conducted by OmniActive Health Technologies showed consumers may be turning their sights toward ginger, one of the oldest and most trusted natural remedies for addressing a variety of digestive health issues.

Ginger is one of the top consumer choices to remedy nausea, as indicated by OmniActive’s survey, which showed 60 percent of women said they would choose ginger as a remedy to relieve their morning sickness.

In terms of motion sickness, more than one-quarter of survey respondents preferred to address this issue with ginger, second to the popular motion sickness drug Dramamine.

Read the complete article by downloading INSIDER’s Digestive Health Digital Magazine.

Becky Wright is marketing manager - Innovation at OmniActive Health Technologies. She has 18 years of experience in the nutritional products industry, most recently with krill oil supplier Aker BioMarine. Prior to that she was the editor of an industry publication for 13 years.

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