Ingredient Insights Video: Natural Sweetener Ingredients

<p>Thanks to the global obesity epidemic, nearly all forms of sweeteners are coming under intense scrutiny from healthcare professionals, lawmakers and consumer advocacy groups. In May 2016, FDA unveiled new requirements for the Nutrition Facts label of packaged foods, including the reporting of a product&rsquo;s added sugar content. The new attention to added sugar intake on packaging, as well as consumers&rsquo; shift away from sugar or artificial sweeteners, provides food and beverage manufacturers the opportunity to reformulate products and increase use of natural sweeteners.</p>

Thanks to the global obesity epidemic, nearly all forms of sweeteners are coming under intense scrutiny from healthcare professionals, lawmakers and consumer advocacy groups. In May 2016, FDA unveiled new requirements for the Nutrition Facts label of packaged foods, including the reporting of a product’s added sugar content. The new attention to added sugar intake on packaging, as well as consumers’ shift away from sugar or artificial sweeteners, provides food and beverage manufacturers the opportunity to reformulate products and increase use of natural sweeteners.

According to recent SPINS data, brands looking to stake a new claim to consumers’ purchases are turning to natural alternative sweeteners, which carry consumer associations of health benefits, such as fewer calories, lower glycemic impact and clean-label attributes. Examples of natural sweeteners increasingly being used include stevia and stevia blends, monk fruit, honey, syrups, sugar alcohols and prebiotic fibers.

The market for sugar alternatives is strong, and the global market for sugar substitutes is projected to reach $US16.53 billion by 2020. North America was estimated to be the largest market for sugar substitutes in 2015, while the Asia-Pacific region is projected to be the fastest-growing market over the next four years.

For more information on the sweeteners market, visit:

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